Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

More News

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Relative deprivation and migration in an agricultural setting of Nepal

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Bhandari, Prem B. 2004. "Relative deprivation and migration in an agricultural setting of Nepal." Population and Environment, 25(5), 475-499.

Are individuals from a relatively more deprived household more likely to migrate for work reasons compared to those from a relatively less deprived household? In this paper, I have empirically tested the relative deprivation hypothesis of migration put forth by Oded Stark and his colleagues. I used data from 1465 farming households in a rural agricultural setting of Nepal. The data was collected from the western Chitwan Valley in 1996. With these data, I used a logistic regression analysis technique to examine the influence of relative deprivation on migration. My findings support the hypothesis that individuals from households with relatively less access to cultivated land are more likely to migrate in search of work compared to those from a relatively well-off household with more land holdings. My findings can be useful in understanding the significance of relative deprivation in household migration decisions where access to cultivable land is declining due to land fragmentation as a result of population growth and land division by inheritance.

DOI:10.1023/B:POEN.0000036931.73465.79 (Full Text)

Licensed Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next