Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Clinton's and Trump's appeal to voters viewed from perspective of Neidert and Lesthaeghe's SDT framework

Stephenson assessing in-home HIV testing and counseling for male couples

Thompson says mass incarceration causes collapse of Detroit neighborhoods

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Family-Planning Practices Among Women With Diabetes and Overweight and Obese Women in the 2002 National Survey for Family Growth

Publication Abstract

Vahratian, Anjel, Jennifer S. Barber, Jean M. Lawrence, and Catherine Kim. 2009. "Family-Planning Practices Among Women With Diabetes and Overweight and Obese Women in the 2002 National Survey for Family Growth." Diabetes Care, 32(6): 1026-1031.

We analyzed the responses of 5,955 participants aged 20-44 years in the 2002 National Survey for Family Growth. Diabetes, BMI, desire for pregnancy, history of infertility treatment, sexual activity, parity, and demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, income, insurance, and smoking history) were obtained by self-report. Lack of contraception was defined as absence of hormonal-, barrier-, or sterilization-based methods. Associations among contraception, diabetes, and BMI category were assessed in multivariable logistic regression models in nonsterile, sexually active women.

RESULTS - In unadjusted comparisons among sexually active women who were not sterilized, women with diabetes were more likely to lack contraception than women without diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 2.61. [95% CI 1.22-5.58]). Women with BMI >= 35 kg/m(2) were more likely to lack contraception than women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) (1..63 [1.16-2.28]), but associations between contraception use and lesser degrees of overweight and obesity were not significant. In multivariable models, women who were older (aged >= 30 vs. 20-29 years), were of non-Hispanic black race, were cohabitating, had a history of infertility treatment, and desired or were ambivalent about pregnancy were significantly more likely to lack contraception. The associations among diabetes, BMI, and contraception were no longer significant after these adjustments.

CONCLUSIONS - Older women with diabetes and obesity who desire pregnancy, regardless of pregnancy intention, should be targeted for preconceptive management. Diabetes Care 32:1.026-1031, 2009

DOI:10.2337/dc08-2105 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2681041. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next