Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Mitchell finds children who lose fathers suffer at cellular level

Seefeldt says hard work alone won't allow poor to reach middle-class status in America

Shaefer says proposed plan to cover tax cuts would hurt a lot of struggling Americans

More News

Highlights

Neal Krause wins GSA's Robert Kleemeier Award

MiCDA Research Fellowship - applications due July 21, 2017

U-M awarded $58 million to develop ideas for preventing and treating health problems

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

More Highlights

Association between characteristics of current menses and preference for induced amenorrhea

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hardy, Ellen, Eliana Maria Hebling, Maria Helena de Sousa, Elsbeth Kneuper, and Rachel C. Snow. 2009. "Association between characteristics of current menses and preference for induced amenorrhea." Contraception, 80(3): 266-269.

Background: Several studies suggest that many women would prefer to avoid menses altogether, but few studies have examined the social or clinical predictors of such preference.

Study Design: In total, 1224 healthy women of reproductive age were surveyed in Brazil, Germany and the United States regarding social, menstrual and reproductive characteristics and preferences for various dimensions of menstruation, including the ideal interval between menses. The extent to which a preference to never bleed was predicted by current experiences with menses was evaluated.

Results: Long menses, menstrual pain and a perceived high cost of pads and tampons were predictive of preferring amenorrhea over all other menstrual patterns after controlling for age, parity and education. Independent significant associations were also found with increasing degrees of life stress and ever use of injectable contraceptives.

Conclusion: A negative experience with menstruation, a high ranking of life stress and ever use of injectable contraception were independently associated with a preference to avoid menses altogether.

DOI:10.1016/j.contraception.2009.06.010 (Full Text)

Countries of focus: Brazil, Germany, United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next