Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Cheng finds marriage may not be best career option for women

Lam discusses youth population dynamics and economics in sub-Saharan Africa

Work by Bailey and Dynarski cited in NYT piece on income inequality

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

Myron Gutmann photo

From Preserving the Past to Preserving the Future: The Data-PASS Project and the Challenges of Preserving Digital Social Science Data

Publication Abstract

Gutmann, Myron, Mark Abrahamson, Margaret O. Adams, Micah Altman, Caroline Arms, Kenneth) Bollen, Michael Carlson, Jonathan Crabtree, Darrell Donakowski, Gary King, Jared Lyle, Marc Maynard, Amy M. Pienta, Richard Rockwell, Lois Timms-Ferrara, and Copeland H. Young. 2009. "From Preserving the Past to Preserving the Future: The Data-PASS Project and the Challenges of Preserving Digital Social Science Data." Library Trends, 57(3): 315-337.

Social science data are an unusual part of the past, present, and future of digital preservation. They are both an unqualified success, due to long-lived and Sustainable archival organizations, and in need of further development because not all digital content is being preserved. This article is about the Data Preservation Alliance for the Social Sciences (Data-PASS), a project supported by the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP), which is a partnership of five major U.S. social science data archives. Broadly speaking, Data-PASS has the goal of ensuring that at-risk social science data are identified, acquired, and preserved, and that we have a future-oriented organization that Could collaborate on those preservation tasks for the future. Throughout the life of the Data-PASS project we have worked to identify digital materials that have never been systematically archived, and to appraise and acquire them. As the project has progressed, however, it has increasingly turned its attention from identifying and acquiring legacy and at-risk social science data to identifying ongoing and future research projects that will produce data. This article is about the project's history, with an emphasis of the issues that underlay the transition from looking backward to looking forward.

Country of focus: United States.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next