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Surprising findings on what influences unintended pregnancy from Wise, Geronimus and Smock

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Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

Reynolds Farley photo

Stereotypes and Segregation: Neighborhoods in the Detroit Area

Publication Abstract

Farley, Reynolds, Charlotte Steeh, Maira Krysan, Tara Jackson, and Keith Reeves. 1994. "Stereotypes and Segregation: Neighborhoods in the Detroit Area." American Journal of Sociology, 100(3): 750-80.

Two opposing hypotheses seek to explain why black-white residential segregation persists despite open housing laws. One perspective argues that discriminatory practices in the marketing of real estate are responsible. Another view contends that it is the preferences of both blacks and whites for their own neighborhoods that maintain segregation. Using data from the Detroit Area Study of 1976 and 1992, the authors test the hypothesis that stereotypes among whites play an important role in explaining their resistance to integrated neighborhoods. They conclude that stereotype use links white preferences to discriminatory real estate practices in a way that helps to explain the persistence of segregation in the Detroit area.

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