Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Yang says remittances from workers abroad increase educational attainment for children

Kimball's failed replication of Reinhart-Rogoff finding cited in argument for tempered public response to social science research results

Edin and Shaefer's book on destitute families in America reviewed in NYT

Highlights

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Lois M. Verbrugge photo

Arthritis disability and heart disease disability

Publication Abstract

Verbrugge, Lois M., and L. Juarez. 2008. "Arthritis disability and heart disease disability." Arthritis & Rheumatism-Arthritis Care & Research, 59(10): 1445-57.

OBJECTIVE: Arthritis is the most common health condition in midlife and late life, and heart disease is the leading cause of death. This article compares disability impacts of these 2 preeminent health problems. METHODS: Using data from the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, we studied specific limitations and disabilities, accommodations used (buffers), and accommodations needed (barriers) for US population groups of adults with arthritis disability, heart disease disability, both arthritis and heart disease disability, and disability due to other conditions. Weights and complex SE adjusted for sample design. We hypothesized that arthritis disability is more extensive and troublesome than heart disease disability. RESULTS: People with arthritis disability had more numerous, longer, and more bothersome disabilities than people with heart disease disability. People with arthritis disability used more equipment and rehabilitation, whereas people with heart disease disability emphasized personal assistance, medications, and medical services. People with arthritis disability experienced more barriers and needs in activities and services. People with disabilities from both arthritis and heart disease were especially disadvantaged, with high levels of limitations and accommodations. People with disability from other conditions had the highest social participation, fewest disabilities, and most tailored accommodations of all groups. CONCLUSION: Arthritis had higher and more extensive disability impact than heart disease. Both groups had more difficulty, buffers, and barriers in their lives than people disabled by other conditions. Therefore, arthritis and heart disease are premier conditions for disability attention and alleviation in the US population.

DOI:10.1002/art.24107 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next