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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Developing and Fostering Passion in Academic and Nonacademic Domains

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fredricks, J.A., C. Alfeld, and Jacquelynne S. Eccles. 2010. "Developing and Fostering Passion in Academic and Nonacademic Domains." Gifted Child Quarterly, 54(1): 18-30.

The purpose of this study was to explore how passion was manifested among gifted and talent youth selected from a larger longitudinal study of child and adolescent development. The gifted sample included 25 high school and college students who were selected because they were in a gifted program in elementary school. The talent sample included 41 high school students who were selected because they were highly involved in athletics and the arts in middle childhood. The authors found that passion was more characteristic of participation in nonacademic activities (i.e., sports and the arts). Talented youth were more likely to talk about wanting to do their activity all the time, experiencing flow, getting emotional release from participation, and internalizing the activity into their identity. The authors also found that school settings, and especially regular classrooms as compared with gifted and advanced classes, appeared to undermine rather that support passion. The authors discuss implications of their findings for creating school environments that can foster passion.

DOI:10.1177/0016986209352683 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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