Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

The Economist cites Inglehart in piece on strength of populists

Ela and Budnick find higher unintended pregnancy risk among non-heterosexual women

Patrick, Schulenberg et al. find trends in frequent binge drinking among teens vary by race, sex, SES

More News

Highlights

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

Former PSC trainee Eric Chyn wins PAA's Dorothy S. Thomas Award for best paper

Celebrating departing PSC trainees

Bloome finds children raised outside stable 2-parent families more likely to become low-income adults, regardless of parents' income

More Highlights

Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Li, S.C., F. Schmiedek, O. Huxhold, C. Rocke, Jacqui E. Smith, and U. Lindenberger. 2008. "Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance." Psychology and Aging, 23(4): 731-742.

Adult age differences in cognitive plasticity have been Studied less often in working memory than in episodic memory. The authors investigated the effects of extensive working memory practice oil performance improvement. transfer, and short-term maintenance of practice gains and transfer effects. Adults age 20-30 years and 70-80 years practiced a spatial working memory task with 2 levels of processing demands across 45 days for about 15 min per day. In both age groups and relative to age-matched, no-contact control groups. we found (a) Substantial performance gains oil the practiced task, (b) near transfer to a more demanding spatial n-back task and to numerical n-back tasks, and (c) 3-month maintenance of practice gains and near transfer effects, with decrements relative to postpractice performance among older but not younger adults. No evidence was found for far transfer to complex span tasks. The authors discuss neuronal mechanisms underlying adult age differences and similarities in patterns of plasticity and conclude that the potential of deliberate working memory practice as a tool For improving cognition in old age merits further exploration.

DOI:10.1037/a0014343 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next