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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

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Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

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Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Li, S.C., F. Schmiedek, O. Huxhold, C. Rocke, Jacqui Smith, and U. Lindenberger. 2008. "Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance." Psychology and Aging, 23(4): 731-742.

Adult age differences in cognitive plasticity have been Studied less often in working memory than in episodic memory. The authors investigated the effects of extensive working memory practice oil performance improvement. transfer, and short-term maintenance of practice gains and transfer effects. Adults age 20-30 years and 70-80 years practiced a spatial working memory task with 2 levels of processing demands across 45 days for about 15 min per day. In both age groups and relative to age-matched, no-contact control groups. we found (a) Substantial performance gains oil the practiced task, (b) near transfer to a more demanding spatial n-back task and to numerical n-back tasks, and (c) 3-month maintenance of practice gains and near transfer effects, with decrements relative to postpractice performance among older but not younger adults. No evidence was found for far transfer to complex span tasks. The authors discuss neuronal mechanisms underlying adult age differences and similarities in patterns of plasticity and conclude that the potential of deliberate working memory practice as a tool For improving cognition in old age merits further exploration.

DOI:10.1037/a0014343 (Full Text)

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