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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Li, S.C., F. Schmiedek, O. Huxhold, C. Rocke, Jacqui Smith, and U. Lindenberger. 2008. "Working Memory Plasticity in Old Age: Practice Gain, Transfer, and Maintenance." Psychology and Aging, 23(4): 731-742.

Adult age differences in cognitive plasticity have been Studied less often in working memory than in episodic memory. The authors investigated the effects of extensive working memory practice oil performance improvement. transfer, and short-term maintenance of practice gains and transfer effects. Adults age 20-30 years and 70-80 years practiced a spatial working memory task with 2 levels of processing demands across 45 days for about 15 min per day. In both age groups and relative to age-matched, no-contact control groups. we found (a) Substantial performance gains oil the practiced task, (b) near transfer to a more demanding spatial n-back task and to numerical n-back tasks, and (c) 3-month maintenance of practice gains and near transfer effects, with decrements relative to postpractice performance among older but not younger adults. No evidence was found for far transfer to complex span tasks. The authors discuss neuronal mechanisms underlying adult age differences and similarities in patterns of plasticity and conclude that the potential of deliberate working memory practice as a tool For improving cognition in old age merits further exploration.

DOI:10.1037/a0014343 (Full Text)

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