Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Cheng finds marriage may not be best career option for women

Lam discusses youth population dynamics and economics in sub-Saharan Africa

Work by Bailey and Dynarski cited in NYT piece on income inequality

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

Association Between Cognitive Function and Social Support with Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Okura, T., Michele Heisler, and Kenneth M. Langa. 2009. "Association Between Cognitive Function and Social Support with Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 57(10): 1816-1824.

OBJECTIVES To examine whether cognitive impairment in adults with diabetes mellitus is associated with worse glycemic control and to assess whether level of social support for diabetes mellitus care modifies this relationship. DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING The 2003 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) Mail Survey on Diabetes and the 2004 wave of the HRS. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged 50 and older with diabetes mellitus in the United States (N=1,097, mean age 69.2). MEASUREMENTS Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level; cognitive function, measured with the 35-point HRS cognitive scale (HRS-cog); sociodemographic variables; duration of diabetes mellitus; depressed mood; social support for diabetes mellitus care; self-reported knowledge of diabetes mellitus; treatments for diabetes mellitus; components of the Total Illness Burden Index related to diabetes mellitus; and functional limitations. RESULTS In an ordered logistic regression model for the three ordinal levels of HbA1c (< 7.0, 7.0-7.9, >= 8.0 mg/dL), respondents with HRS-cog scores in the lowest quartile had significantly higher HbA1c levels than those in the highest cognitive quartile (adjusted odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.11-2.92). A high level of social support for diabetes mellitus care modified this association; for respondents in the lowest cognitive quartile, those with high levels of support had significantly lower odds of having higher HbA1c than those with low levels of support (1.11 vs 2.87, P=.02). CONCLUSION Although cognitive impairment was associated with worse glycemic control, higher levels of social support for diabetes mellitus care ameliorated this negative relationship. Identifying the level of social support available to cognitively impaired adults with diabetes mellitus may help to target interventions for better glycemic control.

DOI:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2009.02431.x (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2810258. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next