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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Correlates of Spirituality Among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks in the United States: Findings From the National Survey of American Life

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Taylor, R.J., L.M. Chatters, and James S. Jackson. 2009. "Correlates of Spirituality Among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks in the United States: Findings From the National Survey of American Life." Journal of Black Psychology, 35(3): 317-342.

The present study examined differences in reports of spirituality among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks (Black, Caribbeans), and non-Hispanic Whites using data from the National Survey of American Life. Bivariate analyses indicated that African Americans were most likely to endorse statements regarding the importance of spirituality in their lives ("How important is spirituality in your life?") and self-assessments of spirituality ("How spiritual would you say you are?"), followed by Caribbean Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites. Regression analyses indicated that African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, had significantly higher levels of spirituality than did non-Hispanic Whites. However: there were, no significant differences in spirituality between African Americans and Caribbean Blacks. Separate regression analyses for African Americans and Caribbean Blacks indicated distinctive patterns of sociodemographic and denominational correlates of spiritual sentiments. Findings are discussed in relation to available survey and ethnographic data on self-assessments of spirituality.

DOI:10.1177/0095798408329947 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2964157. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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