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Promoting Academic Achievement: The Role of Racial Identity in Buffering Perceptions of Teacher Discrimination on Academic Achievement Among African American and Caribbean Black Adolescents

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Thomas, O.N., C.H. Caldwell, N. Faison, and James S. Jackson. 2009. "Promoting Academic Achievement: The Role of Racial Identity in Buffering Perceptions of Teacher Discrimination on Academic Achievement Among African American and Caribbean Black Adolescents." Journal of Educational Psychology, 101(2): 420-431.

In this study, the authors examined the moderating effects of different dimensions racial identity (i.e., racial centrality and public regard) on perceptions of teacher discrimination and academic achievement among a nationally represented sample of African American and Caribbean Black adolescents. The findings revealed that perceived teacher discrimination was negatively related to academic achievement for both African American and Caribbean Black youth. In addition, high racial centrality and low public regard buffered the negative consequences of high levels of perceived teacher discrimination on academic achievement among Caribbean Black adolescents. Implications of these findings for academic achievement among Black youth are discussed.

DOI:10.1037/a0014578 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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