Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Kruger says reports of phantom mobile phone ringing/vibrating more common among anxious

Stafford says too early to say whether stock market declines will curtail Americans' spending

Eisenberg says many colleges now train campus personnel to spot and refer troubled college students

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences, Oct 21-22, 2016, CU-Boulder

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

Attitudes of the American Public toward Organ Donation after Uncontrolled (Sudden) Cardiac Death

Publication Abstract

Volk, M.L., G.J. Warren, R.R. Anspach, Mick P. Couper, R.M. Merion, and P.A. Ubel. 2010. "Attitudes of the American Public toward Organ Donation after Uncontrolled (Sudden) Cardiac Death." American Journal of Transplantation, 10(3): 675-680.

Concerns about public support for organ donation after cardiac death have hindered expansion of this practice, particularly rapid organ recovery in the context of uncontrolled (sudden) cardiac death (uDCD). A nationally representative Internet-based panel was provided scenarios describing donation in the context of brain death, controlled cardiac death and uncontrolled cardiac death. Participants were randomized to receive questions about trust in the medical system before or after the rapid organ recovery scenario. Among 1631 panelists, 1049 (64%) completed the survey. Participants expressed slightly more willingness to donate in the context of controlled and uncontrolled cardiac death than after brain death (70% and 69% vs. 66%, respectively, p < 0.01). Eighty percent of subjects (95% CI 77-84%) would support having a rapid organ recovery program in their community, though 83% would require family consent or a signed donor card prior to invasive procedures for organ preservation. The idea of uDCD slightly decreased trust in the medical system from 59% expressing trust to 51% (p = 0.02), but did not increase belief that a signed donor card would interfere with medical care (28% vs. 32%, p = 0.37). These findings provide support for the careful expansion of uDCD, albeit with formal consent prior to organ preservation.

DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2009.02971.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next