Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Kruger says reports of phantom mobile phone ringing/vibrating more common among anxious

Stafford says too early to say whether stock market declines will curtail Americans' spending

Eisenberg says many colleges now train campus personnel to spot and refer troubled college students

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences, Oct 21-22, 2016, CU-Boulder

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

Access to Social Capital

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Boisjoly, Johanne, Greg J. Duncan, and Sandra Hofferth. 1995. "Access to Social Capital." Journal of Family Issues, 16(5): 609-31.

Defining social capital as perceived access to time and money help from friends and family, this article examines (a) the stock of social capital to which families have access, (b) the trade-off between access to money and time help, and (c) the association between perceived access to time and money and conventional measures of family economic well-being. Data come from the 1980 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, an ongoing longitudinal survey of U.S. households. More than 9 out of 10 families reported access to social capital. Some evidence for isolation from social capital among families with a less-educated or older head was found. Surprisingly, families in very poor neighborhoods reported more access to social capital, primarily in friend-based networks. Finally, geographic mobility leads to increased social isolation, because it reduces family ties.

Data used: Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID): U.S., 1980.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next