Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

Chen says job fit, job happiness can be achieved over time

Highlights

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Social Change, Cohort Quality, and Economic Assimilation of Chinese Immigrants in Hong Kong, 1991-2006

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionZhang, Zhuoni, and Xiaogang Wu. 2010. "Social Change, Cohort Quality, and Economic Assimilation of Chinese Immigrants in Hong Kong, 1991-2006." PSC Research Report No. 10-711. June 2010.

This paper analyzes a series of population census and by-census data from 1991 to 2006 to examine the economic assimilation of Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong, focusing on their employment, occupational and earnings attainments. We pay particular attention to the assimilation of immigrants over time, and the effect of changes in the (overall) quality of the immigration cohort as a result of the immigration policy shift after Hong Kong’s reunification with China in 1997. Results show that at the time of entry, mainland immigrants were less likely to be employed, more likely to be trapped in elementary occupations, and earned much less than the natives. As they stayed longer, the gaps tended to decrease, but most immigrants were unable to reach parity with the natives with respect to earnings throughout their working lives. The pattern differed by gender in that men generally assimilated at a faster pace than women. No evidence suggests any significant effects on overall income inequality due to changes in the (overall) quality of the immigrant cohort after 1997.

Country of focus: China.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next