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Unforgiveness, rumination, and depressive symptoms among older adults

Publication Abstract

Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit, C. Torges, and Neal Krause. 2010. "Unforgiveness, rumination, and depressive symptoms among older adults." Aging and Mental Health, 14(4): 439-449.

The experience of feeling unforgiven for past transgressions may contribute to depressive symptoms in later life. This article tests a model in which feeling unforgiven by God and by other people have direct effects on depressive symptoms while self-unforgiveness and rumination mediate this relationship. The sample consisted of 965 men and women aged 67 and older who participated in a national probability sample survey, the Religion, Aging, and Health survey. Results from a latent variable model indicate that unforgiveness by others has a significant direct effect on depressive symptoms and an indirect effect via self-unforgiveness and rumination. However, rather than having a direct effect on depressive symptoms, unforgiveness by God operates only indirectly through self-unforgiveness and rumination. Similarly, self-unforgiveness has an indirect effect on depressive symptoms through rumination.

DOI:10.1080/13607860903483136 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2868276. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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