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Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Foreigners Traveling to the US for Transplantation May Adversely Affect Organ Donation: A National Survey

Publication Abstract

Volk, M.L., G.J. Warren, R.R. Anspach, Mick P. Couper, R.M. Merion, and P.A. Ubel. 2010. "Foreigners Traveling to the US for Transplantation May Adversely Affect Organ Donation: A National Survey." American Journal of Transplantation, 10(6): 1468-1472.

The aims of this study were (1) to determine attitudes among the American public regarding foreigners coming to the United States for the purposes of transplantation, and (2) to investigate the impact this practice might have on the public's willingness to donate organs. A probability-based national sample of adults age >= 18 was asked whether people should be allowed to travel to the United States to receive a transplant, and whether this practice would discourage the respondents from becoming an organ donor. Among 1049 participants, 30% (95% CI 25-34%) felt that people should not be allowed to travel to the United States to receive a deceased donor transplant, whereas 28% felt this would be acceptable in some cases. Thirty-eight percent (95% CI 33-42%) indicated that this practice might prevent them from becoming an organ donor. In conclusion, deceased-donor transplantation of foreigners is opposed by many Americans. Media coverage of this practice has the potential to adversely affect organ donation.

DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2010.03111.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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