Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stephenson says homophobia among gay men raises risk of intimate partner violence

Frey says having more immigrants with higher birth rates fills need in the US

Inglehart's work on the rise of populism cited in NYT

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Foreigners Traveling to the US for Transplantation May Adversely Affect Organ Donation: A National Survey

Publication Abstract

Volk, M.L., G.J. Warren, R.R. Anspach, Mick P. Couper, R.M. Merion, and P.A. Ubel. 2010. "Foreigners Traveling to the US for Transplantation May Adversely Affect Organ Donation: A National Survey." American Journal of Transplantation, 10(6): 1468-1472.

The aims of this study were (1) to determine attitudes among the American public regarding foreigners coming to the United States for the purposes of transplantation, and (2) to investigate the impact this practice might have on the public's willingness to donate organs. A probability-based national sample of adults age >= 18 was asked whether people should be allowed to travel to the United States to receive a transplant, and whether this practice would discourage the respondents from becoming an organ donor. Among 1049 participants, 30% (95% CI 25-34%) felt that people should not be allowed to travel to the United States to receive a deceased donor transplant, whereas 28% felt this would be acceptable in some cases. Thirty-eight percent (95% CI 33-42%) indicated that this practice might prevent them from becoming an organ donor. In conclusion, deceased-donor transplantation of foreigners is opposed by many Americans. Media coverage of this practice has the potential to adversely affect organ donation.

DOI:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2010.03111.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next