Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

Levy et al. find Michigan's Medicaid expansion boosted state's economy while increasing number of insured

More News

Highlights

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Yasamin Kusunoki photo

Relationship Characteristics and Conflict Reported in an Online Weekly Survey: Preliminary Results

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionKusunoki, Yasamin, Jennifer S. Barber, Heather Gatny, and Jamie Budnick. 2010. "Relationship Characteristics and Conflict Reported in an Online Weekly Survey: Preliminary Results." PSC Research Report No. 10-719. 10 2010.

This paper examines the role of young women’s relationship characteristics on experiences of conflict within relationships. We use new longitudinal data from a weekly mixed-mode (online or phone) journal-based survey spanning two and half years. We investigate the effects of time-varying relationship characteristics that capture the intensity, instability, and asymmetry within and across relationships on conflict among a sample of almost 1000 18-21 year old women. The results are preliminary but suggest that the characteristics of young women’s relationships influence the likelihood of experiencing conflict net of important individual-level correlates and that the effects of relationship characteristics differ depending on the type of conflict examined (fought or argued only versus experienced verbal and/or physical conflict). Intensity of relationships increases the risk of both types of conflict while instability and asymmetry within relationships increases the risk of experiencing verbal or physical conflict only. In the final paper to be presented at the ASA conference, analyses will be expanded to include additional measures of asymmetry and cumulative measures of young women’s relationship experiences as well as measures of change within relationships. We will also explore data from semi-structured interviews to better understand the findings from the quantitative component of the study.

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next