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Bailey and Dynarski's work cited in Bloomberg article on growing U.S. inequality

Frey says current minority college completion rates predict decline in college-educated Americans

Kimball and unnamed coauthor examine male bias in economics

Highlights

Call for Proposals: Small Grants for Research Using PSID Data. Due March 2, 2015

PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Michigan's graduate sociology program tied for 4th with Stanford in USN&WR rankings

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Jan 26
Jeff Smith, Consequences of Student-College Mismatch

School Enrollment and Unintended Pregnancy in Early Adulthood: Preliminary Results from an Online Weekly Survey

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionYarger, Jennifer Eckerman. 2010. "School Enrollment and Unintended Pregnancy in Early Adulthood: Preliminary Results from an Online Weekly Survey." PSC Research Report No. 10-721. October 2010.

Past research on education and unintended pregnancy has focused on establishing a negative relationship between level of educational attainment and unintended pregnancy. Although educational attainment and enrollment are known to exert unique effects on family formation behavior, relatively few studies have examined the influence of enrollment on the risk of unintended pregnancy. Using longitudinal data from a weekly mixed-mode survey of 18-21 year old women spanning 2.5 years, I explore the relationship between school enrollment and unintended pregnancy. I find that the risk of unintended pregnancy is significantly lower among women enrolled in school than among those not enrolled. Furthermore, I find evidence that the prevalence of friends attending college, expectations for work and pregnancy, and involvement in committed, time-intensive relationships mediate the relationship between school enrollment and unintended pregnancy. In addition, my findings suggest that a key reason why women enrolled in school have a lower risk of unintended pregnancy than those not enrolled is because they use contraception more consistently.

Country of focus: United States of America.

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