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Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Intergenerational ambivalence: Aging mothers whose adult daughters are mentally ill

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit, Ruth M. Dunkle, Letha Chadiha, Abigail Lawrence-Jacobson, Lydia W. Li, Erin Weir, and Jennifer Satorius. 2011. "Intergenerational ambivalence: Aging mothers whose adult daughters are mentally ill." Families in Society, 92(1): 114–119.

Research on families dealing with mental illness has considered either positive or negative aspects of intergenerational family relationships. The current study extends this work by using intergenerational ambivalence theory to examine aging mothers' contradictory expectations toward adult daughters who are mentally ill. This study focuses on interviews obtained from a sample of 22 mothers aged 52–90 who expressed considerable sociological ambivalence in relation to their grown daughters. Four strategies of managing ambivalence are identified: excusing behaviors, reducing expectations, adjusting help-giving, and confronting. The implications are that practitioners should be aware of intergenerational ambivalence, help aging parents identify their ambivalence management strategies, and assess the extent to which these strategies are adaptive. Future research directions in this area are also discussed.

DOI:10.1606/1044-3894.4077 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3115753. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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