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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Relationship quality with parent, daughter role salience, and self-esteem of daughter caregivers

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Li, Lydia W., and Marsha Mailick Seltzer. 2005. "Relationship quality with parent, daughter role salience, and self-esteem of daughter caregivers." Marriage and Family Review, 37(1-2): 63-82.

This study examined the effects of two aspects of relationship quality with parent (relationship strain and affective closeness) on daughter caregivers' self-esteem, and whether their effects are moderated by daughter role salience. Cross-sectional data from 137 married daughter caregivers with children were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analysis shows that relationship strain has negative effects on the daughters' self-esteem, regardless of daughter role salience, whereas the positive effects of affective closeness on self-esteem are stronger for daughters whose daughter role is salient than for those less salient. The findings have implications for how practitioners can help married daughters manage relationship strain with their parents, examine the personal meaning of their daughter role, and bolster their own self-esteem while engaged in parent care.

DOI:10.1300/J002v37n01_06 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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