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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Relationship quality with parent, daughter role salience, and self-esteem of daughter caregivers

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Li, Lydia W., and Marsha Mailick Seltzer. 2005. "Relationship quality with parent, daughter role salience, and self-esteem of daughter caregivers." Marriage and Family Review, 37(1-2): 63-82.

This study examined the effects of two aspects of relationship quality with parent (relationship strain and affective closeness) on daughter caregivers' self-esteem, and whether their effects are moderated by daughter role salience. Cross-sectional data from 137 married daughter caregivers with children were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analysis shows that relationship strain has negative effects on the daughters' self-esteem, regardless of daughter role salience, whereas the positive effects of affective closeness on self-esteem are stronger for daughters whose daughter role is salient than for those less salient. The findings have implications for how practitioners can help married daughters manage relationship strain with their parents, examine the personal meaning of their daughter role, and bolster their own self-esteem while engaged in parent care.

DOI:10.1300/J002v37n01_06 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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