Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Yang comments on importance of migrant remittances to future of recipient families

Frey says America's black population is changing with recent immigration

Bailey and Danziger's War on Poverty book reviewed in NY Review of Books

Highlights

Hicken wins 2015 UROP Outstanding Research Mentor Award

U-M ranked #1 in Sociology of Population by USN&WR's "Best Graduate Schools"

PAA 2015 Annual Meeting: Preliminary program and list of UM participants

ISR addition wins LEED Gold Certification

Next Brown Bag

Mon, May 18
Lois Verbrugge, Disability Experience & Measurement

The DECISIONS Study: A Nationwide Survey of United States Adults Regarding 9 Common Medical Decisions

Publication Abstract

Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J., Mick P. Couper, Eleanor Singer, Carrie A. Levin, Floyd J, Jr. Fowler, Sonja Ziniel, Peter A. Ubel, and Angela Fagerlin. 2010. "The DECISIONS Study: A Nationwide Survey of United States Adults Regarding 9 Common Medical Decisions." Medical Decision Making, 30: 20S-34S.

Background. Patient involvement is required before patients' preferences can be reflected in the medical care they receive. Furthermore, patients are a vital link between physicians' assessments of patients' needs and actual implementation of appropriate care. Yet no study has specifically examined how and when a representative sample of patients considered, discussed, and made medical decisions. Objective. To identify decision prevalence and decision-making processes regarding 1) initiation of prescription medications for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or depression; 2) screening tests for colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer; and 3) surgeries for knee or hip replacement, cataracts, or lower back pain. Design. Computer-assisted telephone interview survey. Setting. Nationally representative sample of US adults in households with telephones. Participants. 3010 English-speaking adults age 40 and older identified using a stratified random sample of telephone numbers. Measurements. Estimated prevalence of medical decisions, defined as the patient having initiated medications, been screened, or had surgery within the past 2 years or having discussed these actions with a health care provider during the same interval, as well as decision-specific data regarding patient knowledge, attitudes and patient-provider interactions. Results. 82.2% of the target population reported making at least 1 medical decision in the preceding 2 years. The proportion of decisions resulting in patient action varied dramatically both across decision type ( medications [61%] v. screening [83%] v. surgery [44%]; P < 0.001), and within each category ( e. g., blood pressure medications [76%] v. cholesterol medications [55%] vs. depression medications [48%]; P < 0.001). Respondents reported making more decisions if they had a primary care provider or poorer health status and fewer decisions if they had lower education, were male, or were under age 50. Limitations. Retrospective self-reports may incorporate recall biases. Conclusions. Medical decisions with significant life-saving, quality of life, and cost implications are a pervasive part of life for most US adults. The DECISIONS dataset provides a rich research environment for exploring factors influencing when and how patients make common medical decisions.

DOI:10.1177/0272989X09353792 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next