Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Neighborhood Stressors and Social Support as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in the Chicago Community Adult Health Study

Publication Abstract

Mair, Christina, Ana Diez Roux, and Jeffrey Morenoff. 2010. "Neighborhood Stressors and Social Support as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in the Chicago Community Adult Health Study." Health and Place, 16(5): 811-819.

There is a growing interest in understanding the effects of specific neighborhood conditions on psychological wellbeing We examined cross-sectional associations of neighborhood stressors (perceived violence and disorder. physical decay and disorder) and social support (residential stability, family structure. social cohesion, reciprocal exchange, social ties) with depressive symptoms in 3105 adults in Chicago Subjects lived in 343 neighborhood clusters, areas of about two census tracts Depressive symptoms were assessed with an 11-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale Neighborhood variables were measured using rater assessments, surveys, and the US census. We used two-level gender-stratified models to estimate associations of neighborhood conditions with depressive symptoms after adjusting for individual-level covariates Most social support variables were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in women but not men, while stressors were moderately associated with higher levels in all subjects Adjusting concurrently for stressors and social support did not change results This suggests both neighborhood stressors and social support are associated with depressive symptoms (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

DOI:10.1016/j.healthplace.2010.04.006 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2918682. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next