Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Seefeldt says 'consumption smoothing' behavior makes long-term recovery more difficult for economically vulnerable

Seefeldt criticizes Kansas legislation restricting daily cash withdrawals from public assistance funds

Prescott says sex offender registries may increase recidivism by making offender re-assimilation impossible

Highlights

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Spring 2015 PSC newletter available now

Formal demography workshop and conference at UC Berkeley, August 17-21

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Elizabeth Eve Bruch photo

Methodological Issues in the Analysis of Residential Preferences and Residential Mobility

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionBruch, Elizabeth Eve, and Robert Denis Mare. 2011. "Methodological Issues in the Analysis of Residential Preferences and Residential Mobility." PSC Research Report No. 11-725. January 2011.

This paper reviews methods for analyzing both individual preferences and choices about where to live, and the implications of these choices for residential patterns. While these methods are discussed in the context of residential choice, they can be applied more broadly to individual choices in a range of social contexts where behavior is interdependent. We review a variety of types of data on residential preferences and mobility and discuss appropriate statistical models for these data. We discuss the analysis of ranked and other types of clustered data; functional form issues; problems of unobserved heterogeneity in individuals and in neighborhoods; and strengths and weaknesses of stated preference data versus observations of actual mobility behavior. We also discuss specific problems with residential mobility data, including the treatment of one’s current location as a potential choice, how to specify the choice set of potential movers, the aggregation of units (such as dwelling units into neighborhoods) and the need to take account of variations in neighborhood size, the problem of very large choice sets and possible sampling solutions; and the link between residential mobility and patterns of neighborhood change.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next