Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Clinton's and Trump's appeal to voters viewed from perspective of Neidert and Lesthaeghe's SDT framework

Stephenson assessing in-home HIV testing and counseling for male couples

Thompson says mass incarceration causes collapse of Detroit neighborhoods

Highlights

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

AAUP reports on faculty compensation by category, affiliation, and academic rank

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Global Demographic Convergence? A Reconsideration of Changing Intercountry Inequality in Fertility

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Dorius, Shawn F. 2008. "Global Demographic Convergence? A Reconsideration of Changing Intercountry Inequality in Fertility." Population and Development Review, 34(2): 519-537.

This research challenges the notion that the second half of the twentieth century was a period of global demographic convergence. To be sure, fertility rates fell substantially during the period, but with considerable un-evenness. The declines in total fertility across population-weighted countries were sufficiently disproportionate that intercountry fertility inequality, estimated using standard measures of inequality, did not begin to decline until at least 1995. Regression analysis also shows that only very recently did lagging countries begin to catch up with countries that began the transition to low fertility earlier. Contrary to findings on changing intercountry health inequality, sub-Saharan Africa has had a greater impact on changes in fertility inequality than China. The trend in fertility inequality, where convergence is a relatively new phenomenon, stands in contrast to trends in inequality in other domains, such as income, education, and health.

DOI:10.1111/j.1728-4457.2008.00235.x (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next