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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

The social position of multiracial groups in the United States: evidence from residential segregation

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Bennett, Pamela. 2011. "The social position of multiracial groups in the United States: evidence from residential segregation." Ethnic and Racial Studies, 34(4): 707 - 729.

I use multiple perspectives on the racial order in the United States to generate hypotheses about the social position of mixed-race groups. Perspectives that view the racial order as binary, ternary with an undifferentiated middle, or ternary with a stratified middle present different expectations for the social position of multiracial groups. I use a group's level of residential segregation as an index of social position. In 2000, multiracial persons lived in neighbourhoods that were more white than the neighbourhoods of single-race minorities, though more diverse than the neighbourhoods of whites. Thus, multiracial groups appear to occupy an intermediate social position relative to blacks and whites, a finding that supports contemporary arguments about shifting colour-lines in the United States and the emergence of a triracial system of stratification. Yet, findings also suggest that the social space between blacks and whites is, itself, racially stratified.

DOI:10.1080/01419870.2010.527355 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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