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Monday, Jan 26
Jeff Smith, Consequences of Student-College Mismatch

Education and Levels of Salivary Cortisol Over the Day in US Adults

Publication Abstract

Dowd, J.B., N. Ranjit, D.P. Do, E.A. Young, James S. House, and George A. Kaplan. 2011. "Education and Levels of Salivary Cortisol Over the Day in US Adults." Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 41(1): 13-20.

Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is hypothesized to be an important pathway linking socioeconomic position and chronic disease. This paper tests the association between education and the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol. Up to eight measures of cortisol (mean of 5.38 per respondent) over 2 days were obtained from 311 respondents, aged 18-70, drawn from the 2001-2002 Chicago Community Adult Health Study. Multi-level models with linear splines were used to estimate waking level, rates of cortisol decline, and area-under-the-curve over the day, by categories of education. Lower education (0-11 years) was associated with lower waking levels of cortisol, but not the rate of decline of cortisol, resulting in a higher area-under-the-curve for more educated respondents throughout the day. This study found evidence of lower cortisol exposure among individuals with less education and thus does not support the hypothesis that less education is associated with chronic over-exposure to cortisol.

DOI:10.1007/s12160-010-9224-2 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3486742. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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