Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Socioeconomic Gradients in Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence of Effect Modification by Urbanicity in Argentina

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fleischer, N.L., Ana Diez Roux, M. Alazraqui, H. Spinelli, and F. De Maio. 2011. "Socioeconomic Gradients in Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence of Effect Modification by Urbanicity in Argentina." American Journal of Public Health, 101(2): 294-301.

Objectives. We investigated associations of socioeconomic position (SEP) with chronic disease risk factors, and heterogeneity in this patterning by provincial-level urbanicity in Argentina. Methods. We used generalized estimating equations to determine the relationship between SEP and body mass index, high blood pressure, diabetes, low physical activity, and eating fruit and vegetables, and examined heterogeneity by urbanicity with nationally representative, cross-sectional survey data from 2005. All estimates were age adjusted and gender stratified. Results. Among men living in less urban areas, higher education was either not associated with the risk factors or associated adversely. In more urban areas, higher education was associated with better risk factor profiles (P<.05 for 4 of 5 risk factors). Among women, higher education was associated with better risk factor profiles in all areas and more strongly in more urban than in less urban areas (P<0.05 for 3 risk factors). Diet (in men) and physical activity (in men and women) were exceptions to this trend. Conclusions. These results provide evidence for the increased burden of chronic disease risk among those of lower SEP, especially in urban areas. (Am J Public Health. 2011;101:294-301. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2009.190165)

DOI:10.2105/ajph.2009.190165 (Full Text)

Country of focus: Argentina.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next