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Owen-Smith says universities must demonstrate value of higher education

Armstrong says USC's removal of questions from a required Title IX training module may reflect student-administration relations

Fomby finds living with step- or half-siblings linked to higher aggression among 5 year olds

Highlights

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Barbara Anderson appointed chair of Census Scientific Advisory Committee

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

China's one-child policy and the empowerment of urban daughters

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fong, Vanessa L. 2002. "China's one-child policy and the empowerment of urban daughters." American Anthropologist, 104(4): 1098-1109.

Urban daughters have benefited from the demographic pattern produced by China's one-child policy. in the system of patrilineal kinship that has long characterized most of Chinese. society, parents had little incentive to invest in their daughters. Singleton daughters, however, enjoy unprecedented parental support because they do not have to compete with brothers for parental investment. Low fertility enabled mothers to get paid work and, thus, gain the ability to demonstrate their filiality by providing their own parents with financial support. Because their mothers have already proven that daughters can provide their parents with old age support, and because singletons have no brothers for their parents to favor, daughters have more power than ever before to defy disadvantageous gender norms while using equivocal ones to their own advantage.

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