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Linda Waite

Assimilation Choices Among Immigrant Families: Does School Context Matter?

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Greenman, Emily. 2011. "Assimilation Choices Among Immigrant Families: Does School Context Matter?" International Migration Review, 45(1): 29-67.

This article explores the relationship between social context, measured in terms of school characteristics, and the assimilation of immigrant adolescents. First, it develops a measure of assimilation based on comparing immigrant adolescents to native peers within the same school. Second, it investigates whether immigrant adolescents' degree of assimilation varies systematically according to school socioeconomic status (SES). Third, it explores the role of parental and adolescent behavior in creating such variation. Results show that both Asian and Hispanic immigrant youth are less assimilated to native youths' substance use and delinquency patterns in lower-SES schools. This association can be explained by parenting behaviors and adolescent friendship choices for Asian youth, but not Hispanic youth.

DOI:10.1111/j.1747-7379.2010.00828.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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