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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Income, Work Preferences and Gender Roles among Parents of Infants in Urban China: A Mixed Method Study from Nanjing

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Kim, S.W., Vanessa L. Fong, H. Yoshikawa, N. Way, X.Y. Chen, H.H. Deng, and Z.H. Lu. 2010. "Income, Work Preferences and Gender Roles among Parents of Infants in Urban China: A Mixed Method Study from Nanjing." China Quarterly, (204): 939-959.

This article explores the relationship between gender and income inequality within and across households in an urban Chinese sample by looking at survey data from 381 married couples with infants born in a Nanjing hospital between 2006 and 2007 and in-depth interviews with a subsample of 80 of these couples. We explore the relationship between family income and differences between husbands' and wives' work preferences. A couple-level quantitative analysis shows that in lower-income families, husbands were more likely than their wives to prefer career advancement and low stress at work, and wives were more likely than their husbands to prefer state jobs. Our analyses of the qualitative subsample show that, even though high-income husbands and wives are more likely to share similar work preferences, the household division of roles within their marriages is still gendered along traditional lines, as it is in the marriages of low-income couples.

DOI:10.1017/s0305741010001037 (Full Text)

Country of focus: China.

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