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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Age Differences in the Demand-Control Model of Work Stress An Examination of Data From 15 European Countries

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Shultz, K.S., M. Wang, E.M. Crimmins, and Gwenith Fisher. 2010. "Age Differences in the Demand-Control Model of Work Stress An Examination of Data From 15 European Countries." Journal of Applied Gerontology, 29(1): 21-47.

There have been many tests of Karasek's demand-control model of work stress. However, no studies have examined how the model may differentially apply to older versus younger workers. Due to age changes in cognitive processing, the psychological demands of jobs may interact differently with controls for younger versus older workers. Therefore, the study uses data from the Eurobarometer to examine how the demand-control model of work stress may function differently for older versus younger workers. The results indicate that different controls may in fact buffer different types of job demands for younger versus older workers. The findings reveal that only the interaction between problem solving and time to complete tasks was significant for younger workers. For older workers, however, the interactions between time deadlines and having sufficient time to complete tasks, autonomy, and the interaction between problem solving and schedule flexibility are significant predictors of self-reported stress.

DOI:10.1177/0733464809334286 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2952960. (Pub Med Central)

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