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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Worksite disease management programs for depression - Potential employer benefits

Publication Abstract

Steffick, Diane, J.C. Fortney, Jeffrey A. Smith, and J.M. Pyne. 2006. "Worksite disease management programs for depression - Potential employer benefits." Disease Management and Health Outcomes, 14(1): 13-26.

Disease management has the potential to make great improvements in the treatment of depressive disorders, yielding benefits for both the patients receiving treatment and their employers. This review of the medical and business literature found that this potential is still largely untapped, with few existing disease management programs for depression and only one with a published, peer-reviewed evaluation. However, there is a large evidence base for potential components of a disease management program from the academic literature on quality improvement for depression treatment. The business literature documents several employer responses to depressive disorders aside from traditional disease management including stress reduction and wellness programs, depression education programs, Employee Assistance Programs, and disability claim management. This review finds evidence of substantial costs of this illness in the workplace, particularly the indirect costs of reduced productivity, and potential strategies for employers to reduce these costs.

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