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COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

Levy et al. find Michigan's Medicaid expansion boosted state's economy while increasing number of insured

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Worksite disease management programs for depression - Potential employer benefits

Publication Abstract

Steffick, Diane, J.C. Fortney, Jeffrey A. Smith, and J.M. Pyne. 2006. "Worksite disease management programs for depression - Potential employer benefits." Disease Management and Health Outcomes, 14(1): 13-26.

Disease management has the potential to make great improvements in the treatment of depressive disorders, yielding benefits for both the patients receiving treatment and their employers. This review of the medical and business literature found that this potential is still largely untapped, with few existing disease management programs for depression and only one with a published, peer-reviewed evaluation. However, there is a large evidence base for potential components of a disease management program from the academic literature on quality improvement for depression treatment. The business literature documents several employer responses to depressive disorders aside from traditional disease management including stress reduction and wellness programs, depression education programs, Employee Assistance Programs, and disability claim management. This review finds evidence of substantial costs of this illness in the workplace, particularly the indirect costs of reduced productivity, and potential strategies for employers to reduce these costs.

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