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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Differences in Self-Reported Oral Health Among Community-Dwelling Black, Hispanic, and White Elders

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Wu, B., B.L. Plassman, Jersey Liang, R.C. Remle, L.N. Bai, and R.J. Crout. 2011. "Differences in Self-Reported Oral Health Among Community-Dwelling Black, Hispanic, and White Elders." Journal of Aging and Health, 23(2): 267-288.

Objectives: To compare differences in self-rated oral health among community-dwelling Black, Hispanic, and White adults aged 60 and older. Method: A total of 4,859 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2004) provided self-report information on oral health. Results: Blacks and Hispanics reported poorer self-rated oral health than Whites. In separate dentate and edentulous groups, socioeconomic status, social support, physical health, clinical oral health outcomes, and dental checkups accounted for much of the difference in self-rated oral health in Blacks, but significant differences remained for Hispanics. Discussion: The study findings may have important implications for health policy and program development. Programs and services designed for minority populations should target treatments for dental diseases and include components that take into account subjective evaluations of oral health conditions and perceived dental needs of the individuals.

DOI:10.1177/0898264310382135 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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