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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Marriage timing in Nepal: Organizational effects and individual mechanisms

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Yabiku, Scott T. 2004. "Marriage timing in Nepal: Organizational effects and individual mechanisms." Social Forces, 83(2): 559-586.

Although researchers have consistently found effects of context on family behaviors, there has been less success in identifying the mechanisms of these effects. One reason may be that the measured mechanisms may not have been directly related to the contextual measures. In this article, I examine marriage timing in the Chitwan Valley of Nepal, a setting of rapid social change. Individual and neighborhood history calendars provide detailed, time-ordered information on individuals' behaviors and changes in the context Of neighborhoods. I test how individuals' experiences with nonfamily activities mediate the neighborhood effects of nonfamily organizations such as schools, health care providers, employers, and cinemas. Results indicate that while both individuals' activities and neighborhood organizations influence marriage timing, there is mixed evidence that individuals' activities mediate neighborhood effects.

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