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Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Employment Status of Patients in the VA Health System: Implications for Mental Health Services

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Zivin, Kara, A.S. Bohnert, B. Mezuk, M.A. Ilgen, D. Welsh, S. Ratliff, E.M. Miller, M. Valenstein, and A.M. Kilbourne. 2011. "Employment Status of Patients in the VA Health System: Implications for Mental Health Services." Psychiatric Services, 62(1): 35-38.

Objective: Most veterans who use Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care are not employed. This study evaluated the association between mental disorders and labor force status among VA health care users. Methods: Multinomial logistic regression analyses modeled the relationship between mental disorders and employment among patients aged 18 to 64 who completed the 2005 Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients. Results: Of the 98,867 patients who met eligibility criteria, 36% were disabled, 35% were employed, 20% were retired, and 7% were unemployed. Those with bipolar disorder, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, or a substance use disorder were more likely to be unemployed, disabled, or retired than employed. Conclusions: This study confirmed a negative relationship between having a mental disorder and being employed. Future studies of barriers associated with veterans' employment could help policy makers target mental health treatments and supportive employment services to the unique needs of veterans. (Psychiatric Services 62:35-38, 2011)

DOI:10.1176/appi.ps.62.1.35 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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