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COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

Levy et al. find Michigan's Medicaid expansion boosted state's economy while increasing number of insured

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

College Residence and Academic Performance: Who Benefits from Living On Campus?

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lopez, Turley, and Geoffrey Wodtke. 2010. "College Residence and Academic Performance: Who Benefits from Living On Campus?" Urban Education, 45(4): 506-532.

Although previous research suggests that living on campus promotes a variety of desirable academic outcomes by enhancing students' involvement and engagement with their institutions, research on academic performance frequently ignores the possibility that different groups of students are differentially affected by their living environments. Furthermore, previous studies tend to rely on students from a few large public research universities rather than a broad range of institutions, which precludes any analysis of institutional differences in the impact of residence. Using a sample of 1st-year students from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), this study found that, for most students in most institutions, the type of residence during college does not have a significant effect on 1st-year academic performance. However, among Black students, those who live on campus have significantly higher GPAs than similar students at the same institution who live off campus with family. Among students attending liberal arts institutions, those who live on campus also have significantly higher GPAs than comparable students at the same institution who live off campus with family.

DOI:10.1177/0042085910372351 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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