Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

H. Luke Shaefer and colleagues argue for a universal child allowance

Hindustan Times points out high value of H-1B visas for US innovation, welfare, and tech firm profits

Novak, Geronimus, Martinez-Cardoso: Threat of deportation harmful to immigrants' health

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Pulitzer Prize for book on Attica uprising

Lam explores dimensions of the projected 4 billion increase in world population before 2100

ISR's Nick Prieur wins UMOR award for exceptional contribution to U-M's research mission

How effectively can these nations handle outside investments in health R&D?

More Highlights

Dynamics of Inequality: Mother's Education and Infant Mortality in China, 1970-2001

Publication Abstract

Song, Shige, and Sarah Burgard. 2011. "Dynamics of Inequality: Mother's Education and Infant Mortality in China, 1970-2001." Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 52(3): 349-364.

In this study, the authors analyze the dynamic relationship between Chinese women's education, their utilization of newly available medical pregnancy care, and their infants' mortality risk. China has undergone enormous social, economic, and political changes over recent decades and is a novel context in which to examine the potential influence of social change and technological innovation on health disparities. The authors consider efficacy, or the ability to quickly absorb and effectively utilize new medical innovations, and argue that the social stratification of efficacy provides an important conceptual link between education and the greater likelihood of benefitting from medical innovations. Using the 2001 National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Survey data and multilevel, multiprocess models, the authors show that Chinese infants born to better educated mothers retained a survival advantage over the turbulent decades between 1970 and 2000. This occurs largely because educated mothers more actively sought prenatal care and professional delivery assistance use.

DOI:10.1177/0022146511410886 (Full Text)

Country of focus: China.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next