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Cognitive Impairment Predicts Fatal Incident Stroke: Findings from a National Sample of Older Adults

Publication Abstract

Clarke, Philippa J., Vanessa Blount, and Angela Colantonio. 2011. "Cognitive Impairment Predicts Fatal Incident Stroke: Findings from a National Sample of Older Adults." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59(8): 1490-1496.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of cognitive impairment on fatal and nonfatal incident stroke in older adults.

DESIGN: A large, national, prospective, population-based study of a representative cohort of older Canadians followed over a 10-year period.

SETTING: Secondary analyses were conducted using data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, a population-based study of older adults followed prospectively from 1991 to 2001.

PARTICIPANTS: Nine thousand four hundred fifty-one adults aged 65 and older who had not previously been diagnosed with stroke at baseline (in 1991).

MEASUREMENTS: In addition to known risk factors, the independent contribution of cognitive function (diagnosed in a clinical examination) was examined as a risk for stroke in older adults.

RESULTS: Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that cognitive impairment was associated with twice the odds of fatal incident stroke, controlling for well-established risk factors.

CONCLUSION: This study provides further evidence for the need to consider cognitive function in relation to stroke risk in older populations.

DOI:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03494.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: Canada.

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