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Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults

Publication Abstract

Davis, Rachel E., Ken Resnicow, and Mick P. Couper. 2011. "Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults." Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 42(7): 1219-1236.

A number of studies have investigated use of extreme (ERS) and acquiescent (ARS) response styles across cultural groups. However, due to within-group heterogeneity, it is important to also examine use of response styles, acculturation, and endorsement of cultural variables at the individual level. This study explores relationships between acculturation, six Mexican cultural factors, ERS, and ARS among a sample of 288 Mexican American telephone survey respondents. Three aspects of acculturation were assessed: Spanish use, the importance of preserving Mexican culture, and interaction with Mexican Americans versus Anglos. These variables were hypothesized to positively associate with ERS and ARS. Participants with higher Spanish use did utilize more ERS and ARS; however, value for preserving Mexican culture and interaction with Mexican Americans were not associated with response style use. In analyses of cultural factors, endorsement of familismo and simpatía were related to more frequent ERS and ARS, machismo was associated with lower ERS among men, and la mujer was related to higher ERS among women. Caballerismo was marginally associated with utilization of ERS among men. No association was found between la mujer abnegada and ERS among women. Relationships between male gender roles and ARS were nonsignificant. Relationships between female gender roles and ARS were mixed but trended in the positive direction. Overall, these findings suggest that Mexican American respondents vary in their use of response styles by acculturation and cultural factors. This usage may be specifically influenced by participants' valuing of and engagement with constructs directly associated with social behavior.

DOI:10.1177/0022022110383317 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3171809. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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