Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Owen-Smith says universities must demonstrate value of higher education

Armstrong says USC's removal of questions from a required Title IX training module may reflect student-administration relations

Fomby finds living with step- or half-siblings linked to higher aggression among 5 year olds

Highlights

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Barbara Anderson appointed chair of Census Scientific Advisory Committee

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

Neighborhood Context and Social Disparities in Cumulative Biological Risk Factors

Publication Abstract

King, Katherine E., Jeffrey Morenoff, and James S. House. 2011. "Neighborhood Context and Social Disparities in Cumulative Biological Risk Factors." Psychosomatic Medicine, 73(7): 572-579.

Objective This study examines the role of neighborhood context in the accumulation of biological risk factors and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities.

Methods Data came from face-to-face interviews and blood sample collection on a probability sample of adults (n = 549) in the 2002 Chicago Community Adult Health Study. Following the approach of prior studies, we constructed an index of cumulative biological risk (CBR) by counting how many of eight biomarkers exceeded clinically defined criteria for "high risk": systolic and diastolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, hemoglobin A1c, C-reactive protein, waist size, and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Data are presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) based on generalized linear models with a Poisson link function and population-average estimates with robust standard errors.

Results Non-Hispanic blacks (n = 200), Hispanics (n = 149), and people with low (n = 134) and moderate (n = 275) level of education had significantly higher numbers of biological risks than their respective reference groups (IRR = 1.48, 1.59, 1.62, and 1.48, respectively, with p < .01). Black-white (p < .001) and Hispanic-white (p < .003) disparities in CBR remained significant after adjusting for individual-level socioeconomic position and behavioral factors, whereas individual-level controls substantially diminished the low/high (p < .069) and moderate/high (p < .042) educational differences. Estimating "within-neighborhood" disparities to adjust for neighborhood context fully explained the black-white gap in CBR (p < .542) and reduced the Hispanic-white gap to borderline significance (p < .053). Neighborhood affluence predicted lower levels of CBR (IRR = 0.82, p < .027), but neighborhood disadvantage was not significantly associated with CBR (IRR = 1.00, p < .948).

Conclusions Neighborhood environments seem to play a pivotal role in the accumulation of biological risk and disparities therein.

DOI:10.1097/PSY.0b013e318227b062 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3216672. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next