Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

More News

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

On Educational Performance Measures

Publication Abstract

Muriel, Alastair, and Jeffrey A. Smith. 2011. "On Educational Performance Measures." Fiscal Studies, 32(2 SI): 187-206.

Quantitative performance measures (QPMs) of schools are playing an ever-larger role in education systems on both sides of the Atlantic. In this paper, we outline the rationale for the use of such measures in education, review the literature relating to several important problems associated with their use and argue that they nonetheless have a positive role to play in improving the quality of education. We delineate several institutional reforms that would help schools to respond 'positively' to QPMs, emphasising the importance of agents' flexibility to change the way they work and the importance of a sound knowledge base regarding 'what works' in raising attainment. We suggest that the present institutional set-ups in both England and the US too often hold schools accountable for outcomes over which they have little control - but that such problems are far from insurmountable.

Countries of focus: United Kingdom, United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next