Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Prescott says online option for access to court system can help equalize justice

Hall et al find mixed correlations between religious affiliation and views on reproductive health coverage among women

Bloome comments on Moynihan's controversial 1965 call for national action to strengthen black families

Highlights

U-M ranked #1 in Sociology of Population by USN&WR's "Best Graduate Schools"

PAA 2015 Annual Meeting: Preliminary program and list of UM participants

ISR addition wins LEED Gold Certification

PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 23
Lundberg, State Care of the Elderly & Labor Supply of Adult Children

Margaret Hicken photo

ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension

Publication Abstract

Hicken, Margaret, R. Gragg, and Howard Hu. 2011. "ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension." Health Affairs, 30(10): 1895-1901.

Blacks have persistently higher rates of high blood pressure, or hypertension, compared to whites, resulting in higher health costs and mortality rates. Recent research has shown that social and environmental factors-such as high levels of stress and exposure to lead-may explain racial disparities in hypertension. Based on these findings, we recommend a fundamental shift in approaches to health disparities to focus on these sorts of cumulative risks and health effects. Federal and state agencies and research institutions should develop strategic plans to learn more about these connections and apply the broader findings to policies to reduce health disparities.

DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.2010.1241 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next