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Monday, Dec 1
Linda Waite

ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hicken, Margaret, R. Gragg, and Howard Hu. 2011. "ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension." Health Affairs, 30(10): 1895-1901.

Blacks have persistently higher rates of high blood pressure, or hypertension, compared to whites, resulting in higher health costs and mortality rates. Recent research has shown that social and environmental factors-such as high levels of stress and exposure to lead-may explain racial disparities in hypertension. Based on these findings, we recommend a fundamental shift in approaches to health disparities to focus on these sorts of cumulative risks and health effects. Federal and state agencies and research institutions should develop strategic plans to learn more about these connections and apply the broader findings to policies to reduce health disparities.

DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.2010.1241 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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