Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Lam looks at population and development in next 15 years in UN commission keynote address

Mitchell et al. find harsh family environments may magnify disadvantage via impact on 'genetic architecture'

Frey says Arizona's political paradoxes explained in part by demography

Highlights

NIH announces new policy for resubmissions (4/17/14)

2014 PAA Annual Meeting, May 1-3, Boston

PSC newsletter spring 2014 issue now available

Raghunathan appointed director of Survey Research Center

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hicken, Margaret, R. Gragg, and Howard Hu. 2011. "ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How Cumulative Risks Warrant A Shift In Our Approach To Racial Health Disparities: The Case Of Lead, Stress, And Hypertension." Health Affairs, 30(10): 1895-1901.

Blacks have persistently higher rates of high blood pressure, or hypertension, compared to whites, resulting in higher health costs and mortality rates. Recent research has shown that social and environmental factors-such as high levels of stress and exposure to lead-may explain racial disparities in hypertension. Based on these findings, we recommend a fundamental shift in approaches to health disparities to focus on these sorts of cumulative risks and health effects. Federal and state agencies and research institutions should develop strategic plans to learn more about these connections and apply the broader findings to policies to reduce health disparities.

DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.2010.1241 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next