Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Former trainee Herbert says residential squatters may be a good thing

Work by Couper, Farley et al. shows impact of racial composition on neighborhood choice

Thompson details killings and shaping of official narrative in 1971 Attica prison uprising

More News

Highlights

Michigan ranked #12 on Business Insider's list of 50 best American colleges

Frey's new report explores how the changing US electorate could shape the next 5 presidential elections, 2016 to 2032

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

An Eating Disorder Randomized Clinical Trial and Attrition: Profiles and Determinants of Dropout

Publication Abstract

Stein, K.F., J. Wing, A. Lewis, and Trivellore Raghunathan. 2011. "An Eating Disorder Randomized Clinical Trial and Attrition: Profiles and Determinants of Dropout." International Journal of Eating Disorders, 44(4): 356-368.

Objective: This study sought to determine whether differential treatment effects in the targeted mechanisms of change and eating disorder (ED) symptoms are associated with patterns of attrition from a RCT. Method: The main study was a RCT of a psychotherapy designed to alter the non-weight related self-cognitions as the means to promote recovery and health in a sample of 69 women with AN or BN. Four groups based on point of dropout were compared on demographic, self-cognitions and ED symptoms using logit and piecewise mixed effects modeling. Results: Attrition was highest during treatment phase but no significant predictors were found. During the measurement phase, the direction and amount of change in self-cognition interrelatedness and body dissatisfaction differed according to point of dropout and treatment group. Discussion: Attention to changes both in symptoms and mediating factors that occur during treatment and follow-up may help to identify those who are at risk for dropout and to develop strategies to promote RCT participant retention. (C) 2010 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI:10.1002/eat.20800 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3107987. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next