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An Eating Disorder Randomized Clinical Trial and Attrition: Profiles and Determinants of Dropout

Publication Abstract

Stein, K.F., J. Wing, A. Lewis, and Trivellore Raghunathan. 2011. "An Eating Disorder Randomized Clinical Trial and Attrition: Profiles and Determinants of Dropout." International Journal of Eating Disorders, 44(4): 356-368.

Objective: This study sought to determine whether differential treatment effects in the targeted mechanisms of change and eating disorder (ED) symptoms are associated with patterns of attrition from a RCT. Method: The main study was a RCT of a psychotherapy designed to alter the non-weight related self-cognitions as the means to promote recovery and health in a sample of 69 women with AN or BN. Four groups based on point of dropout were compared on demographic, self-cognitions and ED symptoms using logit and piecewise mixed effects modeling. Results: Attrition was highest during treatment phase but no significant predictors were found. During the measurement phase, the direction and amount of change in self-cognition interrelatedness and body dissatisfaction differed according to point of dropout and treatment group. Discussion: Attention to changes both in symptoms and mediating factors that occur during treatment and follow-up may help to identify those who are at risk for dropout and to develop strategies to promote RCT participant retention. (C) 2010 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI:10.1002/eat.20800 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3107987. (Pub Med Central)

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