Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

ISR's Scott Page says diverse teams produce optimal results

Bound, Geronimus, et al. find estimates of decreasing longevity among low-SES whites sensitive to measures and interpretations

Thompson casts doubt on the rehabilitative intentions of prison labor

More News

Highlights

Seefeldt discusses her book Abandoned Families, Wed, March 29, 4 PM, Annenberg Auditorium

U-M participants at PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29

Heather Ann Thompson wins Bancroft Prize for History for 'Blood in the Water'

Michigan ranks in USN&WR top-10 grad schools for sociology, public health, labor economics, social policy, social psychology

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Kreuter, F., S. McCulloch, S. Presser, and Roger Tourangeau. 2011. "The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format." Sociological Methods and Research, 40(1): 88-104.

When filter questions are asked to determine respondent eligibility for follow-up items, they are administered either interleafed (follow-up items immediately after the relevant filter) or grouped (follow-up items after multiple filters). Experiments with mental health items have found the interleafed form produces fewer yeses to later filters than the grouped form. Given the sensitivity of mental health, it is unclear whether this is due to respondent desire to avoid sensitive issues or simply the desire to shorten the interview. The absence of validation data in these studies also means the nature of the measurement error associated with the filter types is unknown. We conducted an experiment using mainly nonsensitive topics of varying cognitive burden with a sample that allowed validation of some items. Filter format generally had an effect, which grew as the number of filters increased and was larger when the follow-up questions were more difficult. Surprisingly, there was no evidence that measurement error for filters was reduced in the grouped version; moreover, missing data for follow-up items was increased in that version.

DOI:10.1177/0049124110392342 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next