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Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Axinn says new data on campus rape will "allow students to see for themselves the full extent of this problem"

Frey says white population is growing in Detroit and other large cities


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 5 at noon, 6050 ISR
Colter Mitchell: Biological consequences of poverty

The impact of family behaviors and communication patterns on chronic illness outcomes: a systematic review

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Rosland, A., Michele Heisler, and J. Piette. 2012. "The impact of family behaviors and communication patterns on chronic illness outcomes: a systematic review." Journal of behavioral medicine, 35(2): 221-39.

In general, social support from family members affects chronic illness outcomes, but evidence on which specific family behaviors are most important to adult patient outcomes has not been summarized. We systematically reviewed studies examining the effect of specific family member behaviors and communication patterns on adult chronic illness self-management and clinical outcomes. Thirty studies meeting inclusion criteria were identified, representing 22 participant cohorts, and including adults with arthritis, chronic cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and/or end stage renal disease. Family emphasis on self-reliance and personal achievement, family cohesion, and attentive responses to symptoms were associated with better patient outcomes. Critical, overprotective, controlling, and distracting family responses to illness management were associated with negative patient outcomes. Study limitations included cross-sectional designs (11 cohorts); however results from longitudinal studies were similar. Findings suggest that future interventions aiming to improve chronic illness outcomes should emphasize increased family use of attentive coping techniques and family support for the patient's autonomous motivation.

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