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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Occupational Gradients in Smoking Behavior and Exposure to Workplace Environmental Tobacco Smoke

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fujishiro, K., K. Stukovsky, Ana Diez Roux, P. Landsbergis, and C. Burchfiel. 2012. "Occupational Gradients in Smoking Behavior and Exposure to Workplace Environmental Tobacco Smoke." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 54(2): 136-145.

Objective: This study examines associations of occupation with smoking status, amount smoked among current and former smokers (number of cigarettes per day and lifetime cigarette consumption (pack-years)), and workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) independent from income and education. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from a community sample (n = 6355, age range: 45-84) using logistic and multinomial regression. All analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for socio-demographic variables. Results: Male blue-collar and sales/office workers had higher odds of having consumed more than 20 pack-years of cigarettes "than managers/professionals. For both male and female current or former smokers, exposure to workplace ETS was consistently and strongly associated with heavy smoking and greater pack-years. Conclusions: Blue-collar workplaces are associated with intense smoking and ETS exposure. Smoking must be addressed at both the individual and workplace levels especially in blue-collar workplaces.

DOI:10.1097/JOM.0b013e318244501e (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3275688. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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