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Parents' testosterone and children's perception of parent-child relationship quality

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Dorius, Cassandra, A. Booth, J. Hibel, D.A. Granger, and D. Johnson. 2011. "Parents' testosterone and children's perception of parent-child relationship quality." Hormones and Behavior, 60(5): 512-519.

We examine the link between parental testosterone and children's perceptions of their relationship with their mother and father. Using data from 352 predominantly white working and middle class families, we find no direct link between mother's and father's testosterone and parent-child closeness. However, the association between mothers' testosterone and mother-child closeness appears to be influenced by the quality of two other family relationships. When father's marital satisfaction is low, mothers with high testosterone have a poorer relationship with their children. And, when fathers report low levels of intimacy with their children, high testosterone women have a poorer relationship with their children. No comparable associations were observed among fathers. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2011.07.020 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3210413. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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