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Social network and health outcomes among African American cardiac rehabilitation patients

Publication Abstract

Tkatch, R., N. Artinian, J. Abrams, J. Mahn, M. Franks, S. Keteyian, B. Franklin, Amy M. Pienta, and S. Schwartz. 2011. "Social network and health outcomes among African American cardiac rehabilitation patients." Heart & Lung, 40(3): 193-200.

OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that the number of close social network members and the health-related support provided by social network members are predictive of coping efficacy and health behaviors. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were collected from 115 African Americans enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation. Measures included the social convoy model, SF-36, the Social Interaction Questionnaire, the Patient Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and an investigator-developed assessment of health behaviors. RESULTS: Bivariate relationships were found between the number of inner network members and coping efficacy (r = .19, P < .05) and health behaviors (r = .18, P < .06), and between health-related support and coping efficacy (r = .22, P < .05) and health behaviors (r = .28, P < .001). Regression analyses support the hypothesis that close network members predicted better coping efficacy (beta = .18, P < .05) and health behaviors (beta = .19, P < .05). Health-related support also predicted coping efficacy (beta = .23, P < .05) and health behaviors (beta = .30, P < .01). CONCLUSION: African Americans with larger inner networks have more health support, better health behaviors, and higher coping efficacy. The number of close social network members and related health-support promote health through health behaviors and coping efficacy.

DOI:10.1016/j.hrtlng.2010.05.049 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2972356. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States.

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