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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Social Stratification of Body Weight Trajectory in Middle-Age and Older Americans: Results From a 14-Year Longitudinal Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Botoseneanu, A., and Jersey Liang. 2011. "Social Stratification of Body Weight Trajectory in Middle-Age and Older Americans: Results From a 14-Year Longitudinal Study." Journal of Aging and Health, 23(3): 454-480.

Objective: To depict the trajectory of BMI from middle to late adulthood and to examine social variations in BMI trajectories. Method: Eight waves (1992-2006) of the Health and Retirement Study involving a nationally representative sample of Americans aged 51 to 61 years at baseline were used. Changes in BMI were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling with time-constant and time-varying covariates. Results: BMI increased linearly over time. Compared with Caucasians, African-Americans had higher BMI levels, while Hispanics had similar BMI levels, but lower rates of increase over time. Higher education predicted lower BMI levels and was not associated with the rate of change. Younger age-at-baseline predicted lower BMI level and lower rate of increase. No gender differences were found. Discussion: Observed racial/ethnic and educational differences in BMI trajectory from middle to old age inform policies and interventions aimed at modifying health risks and reducing health disparities in old age.

DOI:10.1177/0898264310385930 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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