Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Former trainee Herbert says residential squatters may be a good thing

Work by Couper, Farley et al. shows impact of racial composition on neighborhood choice

Thompson details killings and shaping of official narrative in 1971 Attica prison uprising

More News

Highlights

Michigan ranked #12 on Business Insider's list of 50 best American colleges

Frey's new report explores how the changing US electorate could shape the next 5 presidential elections, 2016 to 2032

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

To compete or to cooperate? Values' impact on perception and action in social dilemma games

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Sagiv, L., N. Sverdlik, and Norbert Schwarz. 2011. "To compete or to cooperate? Values' impact on perception and action in social dilemma games." European Journal of Social Psychology, 41(1): 64-77.

Two studies investigated how values affect competitive versus cooperative behavior. Each Study presented a new social-dilemma game, in which participants' interpretations of the dilemma (i.e., their subjective payoff matrix)-and consequently the dominant (i.e., rational) behavioral choice-depended on their values. The Paired Charity Game (Study 1) framed the situation in terms of cooperation. As hypothesized, contribution correlated positively with universalism and benevolence values that reflect concern for others and negatively with power, achievement, and hedonism values that promote self-interests. Furthermore, values, but not traits, predicted the participants' contribution. The Group Charity Game (Study 2) was designed to frame the situation in terms of competition. As hypothesized, contribution correlated positively with emphasizing benevolence over power values. Moreover, the impact of values was stronger when they were rendered accessible, indicating a causal influence of values on behavior. Furthermore, when their value hierarchy was rendered accessible, participants explained their choices in terms of those values that were (a) important to them and (b) relevant to the situation. The findings thus point to the mechanism through which accessible values affect behavior. Taken together, the studies promote our understanding of the value-behavior relationships, by highlighting the impact of values on perception. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI:10.1002/ejsp.729 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next